My friends in Fukushima (2) 12/10/2013

I had worked in Fukushima University Hospital as a midwife from 1979 till 1989. For lunch I visited my friends as well as ex-colleagues, H. and Y.. H. lives very nice house in Watari area with her husband. Watari area used to have many hot spots. By implementing decontamination the radiation dose in air is much lower than before.(5-6uSV/h in 4/2011, 0.2-0.3uSV/h in 11/2013; it depends on the area, and 0.2-0.3 is still high.) H. cooked lunch for us. I did not ask but she mentioned that the radiation dose in vegetables made in her private garden, was measured and not detected. H. and Y. are older than I. They work in Fukushima city and have their houses. It seems they never thought to evacuate to another places, though they felt danger by the nuclear disaster in 2011.

I had dinner with my classmates from junior high school. Although they were against the determination of Olympic 2020, two of them are supporting Liberal Democratic Party of Japan (the ruling party and they promote nuclear), because of their community. In Fukushima people are strongly rooted in their communities like work, family, neighbors, and parishioner. It has positive side as well as negative side. Its positive side is that the community would help and protect you. The negative side is that it is difficult not to follow the idea of their communities.

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2 thoughts on “My friends in Fukushima (2) 12/10/2013

  1. I think Fukushima people have strong connection with their land. They hold love for their home much more than other districts around in Japan.
    It is merely to remark for consideration on their condition..

    • There are many farmers in Fukushima. They live in their communities and it is certainly very different with big cities like Tokyo. The community would support you as well as function to tied you down.
      For example, some people wanted to evacuate from Fukushima, but it was difficult to leave their community, mostly family, although they had their own anxiety.

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